Author Topic: Indigo children  (Read 14 times)

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Indigo children
« on: March 16, 2020, 12:19:23 pm »
Indigo children are children who are believed to possess special, unusual, and sometimes supernatural traits or abilities.

Claimed characteristics

Descriptions of indigo children include that they:

1. Are empathic, curious, and strong-willed
2. Are often perceived by friends and family as being strange
3. Possess a clear sense of self-definition and purpose
4. Show a strong innate subconscious spirituality from early childhood (which, however, does not necessarily imply a direct interest in spiritual or religious areas)
5. Have a strong feeling of entitlement, or deserving to be here

Additional traits include:

1. High intelligence quotient
2. Inherent intuitive ability
3. Resistance to rigid, control-based paradigms of authority

Indigo children may function poorly in conventional schools due to their rejection of rigid authority, their being smarter or more spiritually mature than their teachers, and their lack of response to guilt, fear- or manipulation-based discipline.

Relation to autism

Crystal children, a concept related to indigo children, has been linked by autism researcher Mitzi Waltz to the autistic spectrum. Proponents recategorize autistic symptoms as telepathic powers, and attempt to "[reconceptualize] the autistic traits associated with them as part of a positive identity". Waltz states that there may be inherent dangers to these beliefs, leading parents to deny the existence of impairments, avoid proven treatments and spend considerable money on unhelpful interventions. Waltz states that "Parents may also transmit belief systems to the child that are self-aggrandizing, confusing, or potentially frightening".

Discussion as a new religious movement

Nancy Ann Tappe originally noted that one type of Indigo child (the "interdimensional child"), despite being seen as a bully, was expected to lead new religious movements.

One pagan author, Lorna Tedder, anecdotally notes that every pagan woman she knew who had or was going to have a child believed their child was an Indigo child.

S. Zohreh Kermani states that "Despite their problems with authority, uncontrollable tempers, and overbearing egos, Indigo Children are many pagan parents' ideal offspring: sensitive, psychic, and strong willed", but also notes the concept is less about the child's psychic abilities than the parent's own hopes and desire for "distinction from the less-evolved masses."

Daniel Kline, in an essay titled "The New Kids: Indigo Children and New Age Discourse", notes that the magical belief that the innocence of children equates to spiritual powers has existed for centuries, and that the indigo child movement is rooted in a religious rejection of science-based medicine. In particular, he claims that Nancy Ann Tappe derived some of her ideas from Charles Webster Leadbeater (her main innovation being emphasizing the connection between children and the color indigo), and that the New Age adoption of the concept is a reaction against diagnoses of ADD, ADHD, and autism. Kline also discusses how Carroll and Tober have tried to distance themselves from religious beliefs about indigo children in order to maintain control of the concept (even recanting their previous affirmations about auras), and how skeptics and New Agers alike both make rhetorical appeals to science (despite the latter's rejection of it) to legitimize their ideological beliefs regarding the existence of indigo children.

At the 2014 University of Cambridge Festival of Ideas, anthropologist Beth Singler discussed how the term indigo children functioned as a new religious movement, along with Jediism. Singler's work focuses in the Indigo movement as a part of an overall discussion on "wider moral panics around children, parenting, the diagnosis of conditions such as ADHD and autism and conspiracy theories about Big Pharma and vaccinations."